Khalid Shakir featured in #WhyIScience Q&A Broad news story

In a recent #WhyIScience Q&A Broad news story, principal software engineer, Khalid Shakir, shares his journey from tinkering with spare equipment in his parents’ high school classrooms to pioneering large-scale computational tools, his passion for emerging technologies like AI, and the invaluable role of affinity groups like A4C in fostering […]

Khalid Shakir sitting on chair in office building

New project aims to map cellular variation in the healthy human brain

Steve McCarroll and lab alumnus, Evan Macosko, were interviewed by the Broad News team about their recently awarded grant from the NIH’s Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. Their grant aims to create an atlas of human brain cell variation and to better understand what generates that variation. […]

Steven McCarroll and Evan Macosko

Naturally chimeric marmosets present opportunities for autism research

Research presented by Ric del Rosario and lab alumna, Fenna Krienen at Neuroscience 2022, the largest neuroscience conference, was recently showcased by Spectrum, a news outlet for autism research. Ric’s work on microglia chimerism in marmoset brains and Fenna’s work on generating a marmoset brain cell atlas outline new ways […]

Fenna Krienen presenting her poster

New neuron type discovered only in primate brains

Krienen et al. used single-nucleus RNA sequencing to profile RNA expression in 188,776 individual interneurons across homologous brain regions from three primates (human, macaque and marmoset), a rodent (mouse) and a weasel (ferret). They found that an interneuron type that was previously associated with the mouse hippocampus—the ‘ivy cell’, which […]


Clonal Hematopoiesis is Associated with Inherited Variants

Loh et al. found 52 inherited, rare, large-effect coding or splice variants in 7 genes that were associated with greatly increased vulnerability to clonal hematopoiesis. Clonally expanded blood cells that contain somatic mutations (clonal hematopoiesis) are commonly acquired with age and increase the risk of blood cancer. These inherited variants led to specific, acquired mutations that set the stage for cancer. This work was published by Nature and covered by HMS news and the Broad Institute.


Sperm-Seq Reveals the Dynamics of Crossovers in Sperm

Using Sperm-seq, Bell et al. sequenced the genomes of 31,228 gametes from 20 sperm donors, identifying 813,122 crossovers, 787 aneuploid chromosomes, and unexpected genomic anomalies. Avery’s results can be incorporated with earlier studies into a unified model in which the variable physical compaction of meiotic chromosomes generates interindividual and cell-to-cell variation in meiotic phenotypes such as crossover frequency and placement. Her work was published by Nature and covered by HMS news and Genomeweb.


Mouse Brain Atlas

Our Arpiar Saunders has published his atlas of the mouse brain. Using single-cell sequencing, our lab unmasked the unique genetic signatures of more than 560 cell populations across nine brain regions. Here’s an article about the trials and tribulations of creating the study, as well as its implications for scientific research.


Evan Macosko wins the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award

Evan Macosko has received the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, a grant that funds high-risk, high-reward projects from early-career investigators. The proposed project must be deemed creative and high-impact, and since the investigator cannot have received a previous R01, preliminary data is optional. The New Innovators are considered to be […]


Clonal Hematopoiesis and Its Origins

Giulio Genovese has published a follow-up article to his initial discovery of a common precancerous condition. In 2014, we described a common pre-cancerous state, involving the clonal amplification of blood cells with somatic mutations, that is readily detected by DNA sequencing, is increasingly common as people age, and is associated with increased risk of blood cancer later in life. Now, we describe the inherited and acquired mutations that drive this precancerous condition. For more information, please check out: An HMS News article; A New York Times article on heart disease; A feature in Science; A Boston Globe article


Christina Usher Interviewed by the BBC

Christina Usher was interviewed by the BBC for an upcoming special, “The Truth About Carbs”. The interview covered what we currently know about the amylase gene and its impact on metabolism. See Christina’s paper in Nature Genetics on amylase, from her Ph.D. work in the lab.


Fenna Krienen in Science

An article on the Science website describes Fenna’s research to map the brain – first cataloging long-range synaptic connections in the human brain (in Randy Buckner’s lab) and now analyzing the conservation of neuronal types and subtypes across species (in our lab).


Schizophrenia and the Complement Proteins

The work of our Aswin Sekar et al. implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia. For more information, check out: An article in Harvard Magazine, featuring an image of C4 protein at synapses, which was taken by our Heather de Rivera; An article in the New Yorker; An article in the New York Times


Amnon Koren receives the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award

Amnon Koren has won the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, a grant that funds high-risk, high-reward projects from creative, budding scientists at the beginning of their careers as independent investigators. The New Innovators are considered to be among the best and brightest newcomers to PI-dom and each receive a bio […]


Evan Macosko is among MIT Technology Review’s “35 Innovators Under 35”

Evan Macosko has been named a top inventor in the MIT Technology Review’s “35 Innovators Under 35” for his work on inventing Drop-seq. Evan’s Drop-seq technology, which he developed during his postdoctoral research in the McCarroll lab, makes it possible to analyze gene expression in thousands of individual cells simultaneously. […]


TP53 Mutations in Stem Cells

Articles by Stat News and GEN on our discovery (together with Kevin Eggan’s lab) that pluripotent stem cells routinely acquire dominant-negative mutations in the TP53 gene.  Florian Merkle and Sulagna (Dia) Ghosh led the research team.


Steve McCarroll, Beth Stevens, and Mike Carroll win the NAMI Award

NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is an organization dedicated to building better lives for Americans affected by mental illness. Each year, it awards scientists who have inspired hope through their research. This year (2016), Steve McCarroll, Beth Stevens, and Mike Carroll were presented with the award at the […]


Arpiar Saunders receives a Helen Hay Whitney Fellowship.

Arpy Saunders has received a three-year post-doctoral fellowship from the Helen Hay Whitney Foundation (HHW), marking another step on his scientific journey that started in a cabin in the New Hampshire woods. Having grown up there, it is no surprise that, before coming to our lab, he studied outdoorsy science […]


Matt Baum publishes his book, ‘The Neuroethics of Biomarkers’.

Matt Baum (a student in the lab) has written a book, published by Oxford University Press and available through Amazon, on the challenges and controversies involved in using disease biomarkers to evaluate patients, judge criminals, and make moral decisions. The book shines in its plethora of practical, thought-provoking examples and […]